Ebola patient “throwing up all over the place” outside before admitted to Texas hospital

America’s first ebola patient not only likely knew he had ebola on his way to America, but was sent home from a Dallas hospital only to be seen throwing up two days later all over the place outside his apartment before being admitted again.



Not only that, but he had contact with up to 18 people here in America, including 5 children who went to school.

Needless to say, this could be far larger than the CDC let on yesterday:

REUTERS – Two days after he was sent home from a Dallas hospital, the man who is the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States was seen vomiting on the ground outside an apartment complex as he was bundled into an ambulance.

“His whole family was screaming. He got outside and he was throwing up all over the place,” resident Mesud Osmanovic, 21, said on Wednesday, describing the chaotic scene before the man was admitted to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital on Sunday where he is in serious condition.

The hospital cited the man’s privacy as the reason for not identifying him. However, Gee Melish, who said he was a family friend, identified the man in Texas infected with Ebola as Thomas Eric Duncan.

The New York Times said that Duncan, in his mid-40s, helped transport a pregnant woman suffering from Ebola to a hospital in Liberia, where she was turned away for lack of space. Duncan helped bring the woman back to her family’s home and carried her into the house, where she later died, the newspaper reported. Four days later Duncan left for the United States, the Times said, citing the woman’s parents and neighbors.

Texas health officials said that up to 18 people, including five children, had contact with the Ebola patient after he traveled to the United States from Liberia in late September. The children had gone to school early this week but have since been sent home and are being monitored for symptoms.

The Dallas Ebola case has prompted national concern over the potential for a wider spread of the deadly virus from West Africa, where at least 3,338 people have died in the worst outbreak on record.

U.S. health officials have said the country’s healthcare system was well prepared to contain any spread of Ebola, through careful tracking of people who had contact with the patient and appropriate care for those admitted to hospital.

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