Obama 1995: ‘Scapegoat’ the Top 5%


***UPDATED***

Looks like the folks at Breitbart dug up a little Jewel:

In a newly-uncovered interview from the Hyde Park Citizen newspaper circa December 28, 1995, Barack Obama explains his philosophy on income inequality in the United States, especially in light of economic difficulties:

In an environment of scarcity, where the cost of living is rising, folks begin to get angry and bitter and look for scapegoats. Historically, instead of looking at the top 5% of this country that controls all the wealth, we turn towards each other, and the Republicans have added to the fire.

In that interview, Obama explains that his perspective on the “top 5%” was shaped by his experiences abroad:

It’s about power. My travels made me sensitive to the plight of those without power and the issues of class and inequalities as it relates to wealth and power. Anytime you have been overseas in these so-called third world countries, one thing you see is the vast disparity of wealth of those who are part of power structure and those outside of it.

There’s more here.



(h/t: Weasel Zippers)

UPDATE: Just wanted to mention this. Do you think Obama is trying to create an environment of scarcity? Given our current economic and energy indicators, it sure seems like it to me. Then he can further pit people against the wealthy. Do you remember the phrase “never let a crisis go to waste”?

Also, what’s with his characterization “so-called third world countries”? If he’s not going to call them third-world countries, he must believe they are are victims of American prosperity. Now that I think about it, seems like I remember Obama mentioning redistribution of wealth from our nation to other nations. If you can find the reference, note it in the comments and I’ll plug it in.

Just wanted to point that out.


Comment Policy: Please read our comment policy before making a comment. In short, please be respectful of others and do not engage in personal attacks. Otherwise we will revoke your comment privileges.