By The Right Scoop


An excellent monologue by ZoNation on the use of the ‘N’ word by afro-centrics who hate white people for using it but don’t mind it when Tarantino uses it gratuitously in his films, including Django Unchained. And more:

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  • objective123

    I am black and will not watch that movie. I find it very interesting that Leonardo DiCaprio who previously stared in less roles with blacks but, now he was so excited to play this slave master which says the N-Word 176 times in the movie.

    Jamie, who was born and raised in Texas, has lost his freakin homosexual mind. Calling Obama his Lord and Savior and he supposedly is baptist. Negro please. Hypocrites come in all forms.

    • http://www.therightscoop.com/ The Right Scoop

      When he said gratuitous use, I didn’t realize he meant 167 times. Good grief!

      • CPAguy

        Haven’t seen the movie yet.

        But in reading about the making of the movie (due to the controversy), the makers and actors certainly knew it was going to be controversial. The use of the word is evidently supposed to be in the context of that period, rather than our current period.

        Given that interpretation, this seems to be much ado about nothing.

        I haven’s seen anybody able to articulate their problem with the use of the word…given the context.

        I certainly hope this site isn’t going to go the route of The Blaze with all the unnecessary race baiting topics that don’t actually have any insight about racial issues, but rather are merely used to get comments.

        I think the concern trolling about this is silly.

        • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=590332089 Earl John Hefforn

          yet ?? You mean you are planning to actually at some point view this piece of celluloid sh*t ??

          • CPAguy

            Saw the movie a couple of days ago.

            It was terrific.

            The criticism is totally unwarranted.

    • CPAguy

      My understanding is that that the use of the “N” word was intentional….as a way to convey the savagery of the period.

      I’ll withhold judgement until I see it…it has received some pretty good reviews.

      Jamie Foxx was joking about the Obama thing, it is obvious once you watch the video clip. The guy is above all, a comedian.

      People get upset about the stupidest, most inconsequential things these days.

      • objective123

        Okay, Joking about slavery when you have a black president is not cool. Liberals sure do show their RACIST HYPOCRITE tendency. If the N-Word is a derogatory thing, then it is derogatory. The use of the word is meant to say blacks are crazy people. For liberals, this is how they view blacks (as inferior). Liberals think the only thing blacks and other people of color should do is be in welfare, on a plantation, etc… If they are able to put a black overseer of the plantation like Obama as one that continues to lead blacks to be enslaved by being wards of the state, so be it for a liberal.

        • CPAguy

          Certainly, I agree with your comments on liberals.

          However, I simply cannot give much concern to what words people find offensive or to those who have concern about what others have offensive.

          That is simply a losing battle…that will kept on being lost.

        • Leedae

          I think it is a insult to use the name Obama in the same sentence as slavery. The only thing he has in common with black people is the color of his skin, he is kinda black. He only uses his blackness when it suits him.

          • factsobill

            He certainly seems to be ashamed of his white half.

      • TLaMana

        Rotten Tomatoes gave it a 89% Rotten score.

      • Nukeman60

        My understanding is that that the use of the “N” word was intentional…‘ – c

        Ya think? Hard to write a script and accidentally use the word that many times. You might be right in what they were trying to portray, but I guarantee you some Conservative couldn’t use it for any reason, no matter what they wanted to portray.

        If it’s too sensative for one side to talk like this, then it’s too sensative for the other side, as well. Even the playing field or let everyone talk the way they want. Personally, I don’t think anyone should tell me what words in our language are banned for use. That distinction should be made by the individual and should be controlled by our own sense of decency.

        The problem with people like Foxx and Maher is they constantly claim their statements can be over the top – because they are comedians. Yes, he used it as a joke. No, it is not obvious that he doesn’t really mean it, either. It’s your opinion that it was obvious and you’re entitled to your opinion, but it doesn’t then naturally make it true.

        • CPAguy

          Why do you want to use that word?

          Is it really that big of an issue?

          There are plenty of things you shouldn’t say to certain groups of people without getting strange looks or even an invitation to a fist fight.

          Wasting time pondering such issues is silly and counterproductive.

          If one’s whole perspective to race comes down to being upset that you “can’t” use certain words…then I think your priorities are probably in the wrong place.

          • Nukeman60

            First of all, I never said I wanted to use that word. I never use it. But the point was, that you seemed to miss, is it’s my decision to not use it. Others are the ones who get upset if people use it who are not ‘allowed’ to use it.

            That is the big deal. You twisted the entire argument to think people are upset that they can’t use the word, when it’s the ones that do use it everyday that are upset if someone else uses it.

            You appear inconsequential to me. If the argument is a waste of time, then why did you waste your time posting about something you don’t think should be posted about?

            Try not to assume someone’s whole perspective to race just from a comment you misconstrue. It appears your priorities are in the wrong place, not to mention your lack of ability to read.

            • CPAguy

              LOL….no need to be sensitive.

              I don’t mean to imply that you “want” to use the word. I brought it up because….Why do you care about what other people find offensive?

              Human nature isn’t a computer program or a math problem. Human interactions are complex by their nature. Given that, some things are offensive to people in certain contexts. I don’t quite understand how that is a problem for you.

              You could say that it is hypocrisy. But it really isn’t.

              • Nukeman60

                I’m not sensative at all. You indeed did imply that I want to use it, otherwise you wouldn’t have mentioned it. You keep posting comments telling people they shouldn’t have an opinion on a certain topic, while you keep having an opinion on their opinions.

                You need not attempt to lecture me on human nature, either. I know full well about human nature. My opinion on a topic is just that, my opinion and this is an opinion site. It appears to me that your repeated comments are more hypocrisy than anything you comment against.

                I don’t see why you care?

                • CPAguy

                  Like I said…You shouldn’t take my comments personally…as they are more so directed at the consensus in this thread.

                  Do you want to use the word? If the answer is no, what is the problem? Why the CONCERN. It is an issue that has zero bearing on your daily life.

                • Nukeman60

                  I direct my post to you because it’s you who made the statements that I responded to. That should seem clear to you. Perhaps not. As to the use of the N-word, I made my opinion on it.

                  Do you want to use that word? If no, then why concern yourself with commenting on others opinions of it? Why the CONCERN? It is an issue that has zero bearing on your daily life. Your argument works both ways.

                • CPAguy

                  Simply…I’m concerned that you are concerned.

                  Concern trolling concern trolls…maybe…

                • Nukeman60

                  (Shakes head in disbelief)

                • factsobill

                  The both of you are idiots, this much is obvious!

  • BikerHoop

    I’ve often wondered why it’s okay for blacks to call each other the ‘N’ word but it’s not okay for whites to do it. Conversely, I’ve also wondered why it’s okay for blacks to call us ‘honky’, ‘whitey’ and such but it’s not okay for us to call each other those names. Apparently there’s more to self-inflicted race denigration than my simple mind can wrap around.

    • JeffWRidge

      I’m completely with you on that. There is a bizarre double-standard at work these days.

      • tinlizzieowner

        You notice that ‘the media’ never seems to get excited about ‘Whites’ being called “Cracker, Honkey, Redneck, inbred, Trailer Park Trash”? I can’t think of one site I’ve ever posted on where ‘the N word’ would get by the moderator, yet I’ve been called one of all those other words at one time or another, on several (especially liberal) sites.

        • Rshill7

          Yep, there’s even a perfectly good word that sounds similar: Niggardly. It’s a shame we can’t use that one.

          Niggardly : grudgingly mean about spending or granting

          Nothing racist about it.

          • tinlizzieowner

            Good point. Even Obama hasn’t used it against the Republicans in Congress, yet. ;-)

          • freenca

            That is my personal test of a good dictionary, my acid test. If the dictionary defines niggard and or niggardly properly, as in an attitude or pattern of behavior, not a racial epithet, as is now so popular. You are very correct!!

          • Dukehoopsfan

            Several years ago a high ranking member of the Washington, DC government was fired because he used “niggardly” in a description. The outrage was deafening.

        • demographicallychallenged

          You forgot Hillbilly, which in my family is a 302 year old monicar. Verified by the DAR Va 1710.

          • tinlizzieowner

            You’re right. That one sometomes get’s by me. I’m only 2nd generation American. My Grandparents were called “Mic’s” (Irish) “Wops” (Italian) and “Frogs” (French). NY ‘terms of indearment’ from the early 20th century.
            I don’t remember ever hearing my Italian Grandfather greeting his friends with “What’s up, my Woppa” though.
            ;-) ;-)

            • Dukehoopsfan

              Priceless my woppa! ;-)

      • Dukehoopsfan

        I am more concerned with Foxx’s comments during a recent interview thaqt one of the things he liked best about his role was that he got to “shoot a lot of white people”.

        Nice message.

    • Orangeone

      My BikerHoop friend, you forgot the latest “cracker”. That is not racism though and black on white crime is also not a hate crime. Go figure.

      • BikerHoop

        Yup… thanks for the reminder, Orange.

        • Orangeone

          little “c” because they want to kill “cracker babies”

          • BikerHoop

            Yeah, they gotta go after the little ones because they know the full-size version would turn the tables on ‘em.

            • Orangeone

              True! And the full-size version just might have a conceal and carry permit and be well trained in self-defense!

              • BikerHoop

                Shhhhhhhh… you’ll give away all my secrets. ;-)

                • Orangeone

                  Okay I know how to keep a secret :):):)

    • tinlizzieowner

      More of the situational hypocrisy of the left. You want to know why (some) Blacks can use that word? Because ‘White boys’ can’t without being called a ‘racist’, let’s call it reverse ‘Affirmative Action’.
      ;-) ;-)

      • BikerHoop

        I don’t believe in ‘reverse’ anything. I got in an argument just yesterday with some dufus that was spewing about ‘reverse’ discrimination. There is NO such thing as ‘reverse’ discrimination. Discrimination is discrimination.

        • tinlizzieowner

          I agree, i was just being my usual smart a$$ self. ;-)

          • BikerHoop

            I kinda figured that… just wanted to let you (and everybody else) know where I stand.

    • Army_Pilot1967

      Having served in the Army for twenty-six years, I served with a lot of great black soldiers. However their use of the N-word has confused me for a long time. I’ve decided that the word is not offensive to blacks because they use it much more than whites. They have established a “rule” that whites can not use the N-word, while they can use it as much as they desire. I even had a discussion with two black retired sergeants major about that, and I was told, “You can’t use that word, but we can.” Okay, I don’t use it anyway, but the word can’t really be offensive since a lot of blacks use it frequently. Funny how we can’t use the N-word, but blacks can use all kinds of derogatory racial terms towards whites.

      • BikerHoop

        I had the same experience in the Navy. Baffled me then, too. Monday at work I asked a couple of black friends of mine who were bantering back and forth and calling each other ‘N’, why it’s acceptable. They just looked at me like I was stupid and said, “Because we’re black.” End of discussion… LOL!

        • Army_Pilot1967

          Yeah, but try and tell a black person they can’t call you “cracker” or “honky” and see how they react to that!!!

          • BikerHoop

            Heheheh! Too late… already tried. Good thing they were friends of mine or the outcome could have been a whole lot different.

            • Army_Pilot1967

              It’s cool to joke around. I’ve done that with some of my black friends. They can tease hard though. They would insinuate that I belonged to a notorious group of whites. I would then invite them to a monthly meeting as the guest. They declined. LOL….

              • BikerHoop

                And somewhere in the back of their minds they’re probably still wondering to this day whether or not you really do belong to that group.

                • Army_Pilot1967

                  Good. I hope so!!! LOL………

              • freenca

                What I have found is that some people that have grown up in and within the surrounds of the culture , can, in some circumstances, get away with that. And some that have not grown up in the fold of it, just can not, ever!

              • armyvet10

                I just had to reply Army_Pilot1967, by your post name I am going to say Helicopter pilot? Anyway, I had a similar conversation with an African American Sgt co-worker and friend that once told me that his first impression of me was a true “redneck” or possible “Triple K” member. Being the sarcastic humorous individual I tend to be, I replied that my impression of him was a BPP member. After a good laugh I asked him why he would think this, his reply was classic. He said “Well, you drive a 4WD, pickup, are proud to be from Kentucky, you’re white and while I don’t know why you don’t listen exclusively to country music, I have heard it resonate from your truck.” He went on to add, “The only thing missing from your truck is a gun rack.” He and I came to be good friends but I always wondered if this is a standard way of thinking for all races. I listen to many different types of music and my interests in life have never been dictated by the color of my skin. My career was form 1980 to 2002, and I had only one deployment to a war zone that being Desert Storm. My deployment could never measure up to what your generation went through in Vietnam, or when you returned home. Thank you sir for your service and I hope any wounds, physical or mental can be eased by knowing that all service men and women are kindred spirits and should always be there for each other.
                A retired and humble SFC, US Army

                • tinlizzieowner

                  When I was in ‘Nam’ (66-67) the Black guys I served with and I used to call each other all kinds of names but when push came to shove, there was one universal truth.
                  There ain’t no such thing as a ‘Racist’ in a Fox Hole. ;-) ;-)
                  There’s one left over battle from the Viet Nam war and that’s to see that you guys (and gals) came home to a damn sight better welcome than we got.

                • armyvet10

                  Thank you for your service and reply. I agree whole heartedly with your thought, “there ain’t no such thing as a Racist in a Fox Hole.” I have no idea of how many I dug in training, nor fortifications for that matter, but I do know the worst place I have ever dug a fox hole was at Ft. Carson Co. Hardest dam dirt I have ever experienced. And sir, you and all Vietnam Veterans were wrongly treated by what I refer to as the Fondamights (Jane MIGHT have only a half a brain). The real tragedy is the slant and downright incorrect manner that liberal historians try to paint all veterans of the Vietnam War. I know by experience that soldiers do and for the most part aren’t allowed to question. As for me; all veterans who served honorably have my respect and admiration. Thank you sir for your sacrifices.

                • Army_Pilot1967

                  Thanks for your service to our nation, tinlizzieowner, and welcome home, brother. I grew closer to some black soldiers I’ve served with than I am with one of my brothers, but some of them still hold in reserve a “certain feeling” towards whites. I don’t fully understand that, but then again I haven’t been through all the crap that I’m sure some blacks have gone through. I appreciated the bond that develops between people, especially people of different races, in the military…..it’s a great feeling, and I wish it carried over to civilian life to the same extent.

                • tinlizzieowner

                  We ‘Nam’ Vets ain’t ‘Fonda’ Hanoi Jane, or Hanoi John (Kerry), either for that matter. I probably won’t live long enough to pee on their graves.

                • Army_Pilot1967

                  Maybe several of us could get together for a pee-farewell to those two one of these days!!! And there’s always hope that we’ll be around long enough for that occasion.

                • tinlizzieowner

                  I know what you’re saying.

                • Army_Pilot1967

                  Thanks for your service to our nation, armyvet, and when the bullets are flying, it doesn’t matter where you are geographically you’re laying your life on the line for your buddies and your country. When one stops and thinks about that, it is so amazing that we have people that willingly do that…so thank you for your service. I worked as an Army contractor after I retired and thought I had become very tight with a retired, black sergeant major. We had a few conversations about racial issues, and he made it clear to me that while he liked me, he certainly wouldn’t tolerate me if I wander too deep into the N-word topic. He pointedly told me I could not use that word….as if I would!!!! He seemed to tense up on certain topics. It seemed to me from his perspective our friendship had certain boundaries; I had no boundaries as far as I was concerned. That seemed a bit odd to me, but that’s the way he saw our friendship. It was like he had 95 percent trust in me for whatever reason. That was okay. He is a great American and has done what so many others have not: served our country for several decades, and I salute him and all others that have served in our military for whatever length of time. And you’re correct about me being a helicopter pilot. I still jiggle when I walk from all the in-flight vibrations……LOL.

                • armyvet10

                  Thanks for the reply, and as for the “jiggle when you walk” comment, I know what you are talking about. I have an Uncle; by marriage, that was a helicopter pilot as well. I have a profound respect for him and I think he tends to like and respect me as well. As for the reluctance of anyone, including your friend the Ret SGM, to fully commit to a friendship with no boundaries, only God knows why. Speculating on human reason is a dangerous thing to do, but I will share a story with you that may further confound the subject.

                  I was in a class room when a young teenager (junior in high school) asked me the following question; “What do you think of interracial relationships?” This young person looked to me as a full blooded African American so I was a bit apprehensive in answering, I asked her; “Why would a person’s race be an issue if both parties loved each other?” This young girl went on to explain to me that her father was “black” (her words) and her mother was Indian. She explained that she felt she and other kids of interracial relationships can be seen as un-pure. I have no idea why I became mad, but I was ticked, still, in a calm voice I told her this; “The contents of one’s heart should be the only measurement of a human being. It matters little the nationality, race or religion of another as long as goodness is sought over petty differences.”

                  This young intense person then asked me a question that really nocked me for a loop. She asked me, in the calmest voice ever; “Would you marry outside your race?” I never really thought about it, I’ve been married to my wife for 29 years now and have never thought about the, what if’s of life gone by. (in relationship to the question asked) Occasionally I think about that question and have never really answered it in my mind. I would like to think a person’s race would have little to do with my decision, but who knows?

                  I think all human beings who have been hurt, or done wrong, put up shields in life to keep from being hurt or wronged again. The best analogy I have is the person that has been bitten by a dog. Chances are they may swoon over every cute dog they see and pet, but will never truly trust a dog not to bite them again.

                  All you can do in the end is be kind and honest and hope all people will accept you as you are, faults and all.

                  Peace Army Pilot.

                • Army_Pilot1967

                  Thanks for your well-reasoned reply, armyvet. You have written some very good, thoughtful comments, and I appreciate your thoughts on this most interesting subject. Let me add one more little tidbit to the discussion: I have several biracial grandkids, and I think that might have ticked off my retired SGM friend as well. LOL. Like you wrote “Why would a person’s race be an issue if both parties loved each other?” I can’t worry about what other people think….I’ve got my hands full trying to take care of myself. I hope you and your family have a wonderful, safe, healthy 2013. Be safe, brother.

      • http://www.facebook.com/tom.schuckman Tom Schuckman

        Hi Army Pilot,
        I wear the same ‘Battle Patch’ that you do, 1st Aviation Brigade, Army helicopter door gunner: 68-70, Camp BearCat, RVN, 2nd tour! Great kick ass outfit, the 240th AHC near the Iron Triangle, and YES, I agree with you about the confusion of the “N” word being OK for the blacks, but not for us poor white boys… lol. email: tschuckman@aol.com — and let’s see where we are. I write a humble Conservative Blog: TOM’S JOURNAL, and sometimes re-post stuff from the Tea Party that I just joined. Have a great day — and Welcome Home! Tommy S –Disabled Vietnam Veteran: 68-70, and retired Chrysler worker: 30.5 years, Welder, etc.

        • Army_Pilot1967

          Hey Tom, welcome home and thanks for your service to our nation! I think I visited Bear Cat one time, but I’m not sure since it was a long time ago in a place far away. Being a door gunner was an important job…thanks for being there during the missions you flew. You performed a critical job and were a key member of the aircrew. I was down at Vinh Long, which wasn’t a bad place to be stationed. Hope you’re going to have a fantastic New Year.

          • tinlizzieowner

            “Welcome Home Brothers”.

    • factsobill

      Get a life!

      • BikerHoop

        Now there’s response worth noting. I already have a life, thank you, and judging by the tone of your “response” it’s a much better life than you lead. Now, don’t go away mad, just go away.

  • http://no-apologies-round2.blogspot.com/ AmericanborninCanada

    “I forgave him the minute he said it, but it doesn’t mean I have to reward him like you’re going to.” Excellently said Zo.
    Thanks Scoop. I have never watched Foxx, or even know anything about this movie except from what I’ve heard and read here lol, so I’d never be going to see it anyway. But the hypocrisy of the left, although always expected, still never ceases to amaze. It’s always fun to watch Zo point it out.

    • BikerHoop

      >> But the hypocrisy of the left, although always expected, still never ceases to amaze.<<

      Don't let them know that. They've never been able to amaze anyone before and it might go to their heads and make them narcissistic… oh yeah, that's right… too late, never mind.

      • freenca

        The leftist whites that fawn to that cultural pandering are not accepted either. They, Just don’t see it!! They will not be accepted for saying so. They have not had the same experience! Neither have the touters of the “black” experience have ever had to deal with the “white guilt” experience either! Zo, get’s that aspect of race relations better than most!

  • JeffWRidge

    As a society, we would be better off all around if we removed these words from our vernacular. We all know the words, but we don’t have to use them. There was a time when certain language wasn’t used in polite company, and for most people, not at all. The language we use is a choice we make.

    As for blacks using that word on each other, that has never made sense to me. Someone once told me that blacks using it themselves was supposed to reduce the sting the word had. That doesn’t seem to have worked. So why not drop the word?

    • BikerHoop

      I was raised in north central WI. Until my junior year in high school (when we moved to a larger town) I had never seen a black person except on TV. We, as kids, used the ‘N’ word in some of the rhymes we used to sing, not realizing the word even had a meaning. It was just a word. It wasn’t until I went into the service that I found out that it was a denigrating term. I haven’t used it since.

  • armyvet10

    Commenting on this subject; and being an older white male will no doubt be construed as hypocritical. I can accept this line of criticism to some extent. Where I see a connection in this is what happens in my classrooms all the time, and I have to agree with Mr. Alfonzo Rachel on this completely. There is no way I could try, or even would try to count how many times I have had a young African American student come into the class and announce their arrival with the “What up my N….s” I have addressed each one of these students about the negative connotation associated with this word. And just like Mr. Rachel states on this video, to these African American kids, they hold to the idea that this is just a term of endearment so long as it is an African American to another African American. I suppose this is the same reason many men, of all races, refer to a woman as a B…hes and feel it is acceptable. As I tell my daughter all the time when she is socializing with her friends and they start using these so called “Terms of Endearment, how would will you feel when someone uses this term of endearment in reference to you, or perhaps your mother? As for me, I am strong enough emotionally to care little for any term of endearment that anyone should throw my way. My stepfather; perhaps one of the meanest persons I ever knew used to say with a smile; “You can call me anything, just don’t call me late to dinner.”

    • Rshill7

      That would’ve been the perfect time to vent…vet. Especially if he were the meanest man you ever met. Good golly, didn’t you at least hit him with a Sorry SOB, Grinchy Grouch or something like that? Consider using those three little words which mean so much when delivered from the heart. Just follow whatever else it is you have to say with these three little words and watch your world change:

      1. You 2. stupid 3. bastard

      I’m telling you it makes all the difference. Try it.

      • armyvet10

        Thanks, as for my stepfather he did prove an old biblical belief, “if you live by the sword, so shall you die by the sword.” (not exact wording, sorry) My stepfather did some horrendous things while he walked this Earth, and his past did catch up. He was shot and killed when I was 16. I will say that his life gave me a perfect reason as to live by a different set of rules, and was the biggest reason I chose to live by the “Lead by example” philosophy. I also accepted the golden rule principle as a better way of getting along with people. What I find out as hard to figure on this is the misunderstanding that many have about the golden rule. Many use it to be mean to others while forcing kindness from the same. To me the golden rule, “Do onto others as you would have them to do onto you” (I wrote this out in case anyone who reads this post and doesn’t know what the golden rule is will now, I’m sure you already know this); the Golden rule means that if a person is going to be deceitful to me, I have the right to not associate with that person. Or I can confront that person with the truth and dismiss them for the liar they are. These two philosophies served me well as I served this great nation in the Army. Believe me when I tell you that in 22 years of service to this country I have used my fair share of profanity in almost every emotion possible; anger, happiness, sadness, guilt, relief and any other emotion I have. As for calling any student a little bastard, well it might be warranted, but since I refuse to belong to a corrupt union, I would not get the same protection and consequently would be immediately fired. That doesn’t mean I don’t at least think it. (and at this time thinking it isn’t against the law)

        Thanks for the suggestion

        • Rshill7

          I took a chance with a little joke. I guess it needed one of these -> :-)

        • freenca

          Something I learned from my parents, and grandparents, growing up was, that in VERY rare circumstance were swear words or any type of name calling appropriate. Usually reserved for actual phyisical injury or some MAJOR infraction against them, relating to a particular incident. Not a casual thing, at all!! A way of relating that I so wish would be abided by today!!!

          • armyvet10

            Goodmorning freenca; and sorry for this late reply. I think you and I are on the same page with the use of profanity, while I freely admit I used plenty during my time in the military, profanity was almost a casual way of speaking. Officers, NCO’s and enlisted often used this language in an almost benign manner. When we were outside the norm group setting, the profanity just wasn’t used. My mother said something that resonates with what your Grandparents spoke; she said “If you use profanity all the time, it loses its shock value.” I never use any profanity while around my students, but while shoveling my drive way, I may have let some profanity slip out under my breath. To any who will read these words, if I have offended you, then I sincerely apologize for my callousness. Peace to all.

        • http://www.facebook.com/tom.schuckman Tom Schuckman

          Hi Vet,
          What outfit, time and theater did you serve in this man’s Army? I just happen to be a disabled Vietnam Veteran: 68-70, a history buff, and a serious student of the Bible, and so I enjoyed reading your statements, and ideas. — Tom S

          • armyvet10

            Sorry for not replying sooner. My MOS was 73C (Finance & Accounting) Spent much of my time in Weapons repair (My choice) Seems I had a good talent at fixing, maintaining and firing weapons of all sizes. I served from 1980 – 2002. (22yrs) Stationed mostly at Divisions 1st Inf Div (Ft Riley Ks) 4th Inf Div (Ft Carson Co) 2nd Arm Div Fwd (Garlstadt Germany) – Desert Storm at this point with 2nd AD Fwd, 4th Inf Div (Ft Carson Co) Sentanced to 3yrs of Torture in USAREC (Recruiting) My last two years were served at Ft Benjamin Harrison IN, DFAS. Budget Control Office out of FOO (Filed Operations Office) The most ironic time in my military career was the day I took my retirement physical, while at Ft. Knox KY, during my hearing test, the 1st plane struck the World Trade Center in New York. Even though my wife and I had agreed it was time to retire, after learning what was transpiring on 9/11, I thought I would be delayed on my retirement, but I said goodbye to all my fellow soldiers in the first week after New Years day 2002. I miss the structure of the military but keep it in my heart always. Now I am a substitute teacher for a very good school district.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rwWW2DQS_DU Booker T. (D – Utopia)

    I don’t like the word at all. It’s a negative word, and it will always be. I cringe when I hear it from anybody. Black. White. Personally, I believe it encourages pessimism in the black community.

    • freenca

      It encourages pessimism in all of culture, IMHO. I too cringe when I hear it!! It has been over-used and the meaning so distorted that it is utterly useless in any way today!

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_IDAKYMXLZIRLMLGEZJXV3AOO7E Vorlath

        What you mention is something I’m not sure liberals understand. They’re all happy that Obama won, but wrongful calling of others as racist and blacks calling each other the N-word is something no one wants to associate with. In situations like that, the correct move has always been to walk away. They are left with fewer doors open and fewer people wanting to associate with them. Of course, the liberals will milk this forever as a way to fan the flames of hatred. It’s their way. And it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. But it never ends well.

        I’m in a minority (not black) and at one point our community had to call each other on sweeping accusations based on our background. The “other side” just walked away. Same as I’m seeing with black people when they use this kind language. Once we started calling ourselves on it and instead deal with the ONE specific person in question, things changed. We even encouraged “the other side” to call us on it. They were in disbelief. “No way in hell” they said. There is still some animosity, but overall, the situation is great. I see none of this kind of progress with blacks. In fact, I see the opposite.

        • freenca

          Yes, you have a keen insight there Vorlath!

  • PVG

    I am reminded of Scoop’s earlier post of Bill Whittles’ Hot Seat…..it’s the culture.

  • Sober_Thinking

    I’d like to see this movie bomb miserably… but I have a feeling it won’t.

    Yesterday, I was stunned to see so many black people paying to go see this trash. The fact that it’s already been nominated for a Golden Globe (before it was even released) is enough for me to boycott it. But the premise, the content, and the language – not to mention the environment – of this film is nauseating. And I guess it’ll further stir the pot and kindle the hatred against white people owning or mistreating black people. Plus, there will be a lot of gratuitous shooting of white people no doubt… so we have racism and a lack of gun control. I thought liberals were against that stuff.

    I hope this movie bombs miserably… but I have a feeling it won’t.

  • http://twitter.com/ignorancecosts Bexcee

    I hated to hear that word when I was a little
    girl in the 60’s & 70’s, and I hate it now.

  • Nukeman60

    I forgave Jamie Foxx the moment he said it.‘ – Zo

    Yep, the good book tells us to turn the other cheek. Liberals like to use that a lot on us. What they forget, though, is we only have two cheeks. They want to keep repeating their offenses to me, the cheek don’t get turned again.

    • freenca

      Yes, Nukeman, the useage is being abused!

    • http://www.facebook.com/tom.schuckman Tom Schuckman

      Right on, Nukeman! Children of the devil do just as their father Satan tells them to, and godliness is NOT in them! –Tom S

    • http://twitter.com/ember_george Ember George

      Don’t forget, you’ve actually got more than two cheeks. Turn the two while trying to make peace. If that doesn’t work, then turn the other ‘two’, walk away and disassociate from the ungodly.

      • Nukeman60

        Nicely said. :)

  • http://twitter.com/stang289 joe

    Demand A Plan? Demand Celebrities Go F Themselves. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1OayyLQi6vE

  • WhiteGuy2

    My fellow whiteguys and I frequently refer to each other as Cracker, or Whitey. Then we procede to chuckle like Beaves and Butthead for about 20 minutes. When that gets tiresome we move on to other terms of endearment such as Blue eyed Devil, Honky, Pale Face, and Gringo. All while smoking a fat one and tossing down 40’s on the street intersection in front of Barnes and Nobles. Then we hit the tavern, get jiggy with our bitches ,and get our freak on. Ah, such fond memories,…. Merry Christmas everyone!

  • socalidays

    wow! good stuff.

  • chatterbox365

    I always enjoy Zo’s commentary. It’s unfortunate to see many in the black community embrace such a trashy movie, but this mentality is a deep rooted cultural issue perpuated by the liberals.

  • Yazz55

    Wow!

    Reading this thread about the use of a particular word and the emotions it releases. Supposedly, in this day and age, where the obamessiah is supposed to be a post racial whatever, this just isn’t supposed to exist. So much for that fantasy.

    What about the silence of the lamestream media, political correctness libfags etc about this? Obviously, they accept it. Otherwise, they’d be screaming racism on the top of their lungs about it! And they get away with it as its from hollywood/pallywood.

    While I’m not black, so I can’t ever say that I know exactly how that feels inside to hear certain language about people who are. But, I am Jewish and have been subjected to many antisemitic comments. And I do know how that feels. It ain’t pretty.

    But its funny how one can get away with disparaging comments about their own kind. I’m probably just as guilty as anyone about making a sarcastic “Jew” comment, because I’m Jewish. I’d probably be all over someone who’s not, and calling them an antisemite for making the exact same comment.

  • aposematic

    I see the movie as the gratuitous exploitation of the rise of mass class/race warfare utilizing all period weapons of mass destruction at its disposal. The blood and guts scenes alone will ensure its financial success. The coming game release will also be a huge financial success. Can people seperate fantasy from reality is the real and only question that gets fuzzier every day what with the Information disseminators(SP) mucking everything up big time.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Robert-L-Macchia/649373637 Robert L Macchia

    Alonzo is so right. If white people use the “n” word we are condemned as racists, but if black people use it in their conversations to each other it’s ok. I don’t like the word at all. Everyone in every race deserves respect even among their own kind. Maybe except for the extreme terrorist Muslim bas—ds.

  • syvyn11

    I used to work in a Amusement Park. One day, I was walking with a young black man, a fellow employee. He called another young black employee a “N” word.

    I told him he couldn’t do that. It’s against the park’s code of conduct and could get him fired. He said, “It doesn’t apply to me, I’m black.”

    A few minutes later, the idiot then called a park guest (another young black male) the n-word. His parents heard him. He was fired later that day.

    If it’s wrong, it’s wrong. No matter who you are.

  • http://twitter.com/ember_george Ember George

    Once again, an intelligent, rational video. Great job!

    • factsobill

      This whole blog is the most ball-less bunch of BS’ers. I’ve wasted my time and my service on a country that couldn’t care less! Like Harvey Vocke said after escaping Nazi imprisonment, If all the gerry’s in the world are closin’ in and there’s no way out. Stop and piss on ‘em! You fools give up your 1st Amendment Rights in the name of PCism and you deserve the the lack of respect you get by non-confrontation.