Here’s BEFORE and AFTER photos of the now finished wall segment built by “We Build The Wall” GoFundMe group!

The wall in Sunland Park, New Mexico (just outside of El Paso) has now been completed by We Build The Wall, the group raising tens of millions on GoFundMe to build the wall.

Today Brian Kolfage posted before and after aerial views of where they built the wall, saying:

HUGE! Here’s a before and after. although wall not completed in this ‘after’ shot but close enough.

Here’s the photos:



They clearly had to move a lot of dirt to build that section of wall. Wow.

According to their GoFundMe page, the final cost has not yet been determined but they put it somewhere between $6-$8 million.

It also says they are now working on segment #2.

In case you are wondering, they are currently sitting at 23.6 million. When we checked last Thursday they were at roughly 23.1 million. So it sounds like they are raising about $100k per day. Big dinero.

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103 thoughts on “Here’s BEFORE and AFTER photos of the now finished wall segment built by “We Build The Wall” GoFundMe group!

  1. Someone please correct me if I’ve mis-measured, but I measured it out to be just a hair less than 4/10 of a mile. If the cost of this segment was 8 million dollars, that would work out to be about $20 million per mile. I believe I read location was donated by the land owner, so that figure would exclude land acquisition costs. This section has some terrain, but it is also right next to major roads and a RR, so relatively easy access. Factoring in more difficult sites, land acquisition costs, etc, $20 million per mile could end up being quite conservative.

  2. Looking at satellite images, you can see why this wall will be so effective, even along this short section. Illegals will be forced to walk hundreds of yards, over very rough terrain in the open with no structures or vegetation to hide among, just to go around the fence.

    During that hike, they’ll stick out like sore thumbs on thermal imaging and CBP will have plenty of time to setup for an interception. Kolfage’s pics are taken from the north looking south, west is to your right.

    If you follow the border west on satellite maps about 1.5KM from the end of the new wall, the US government border fencing begins near the start of a Mexican town right up against the border.

    Kudos to We Build The Wall.

    1. I think this is a very teachable moment.

      I’m very pleased a determined US citizen with a vision made this happen without any government assistance.

    2. Not an option, at least not for the entire wall. Many of the land owners along the border do not want a wall. So without the government taking it, there is no way to get the land.

  3. This makes me VERY happy! American ingenuity and persistence. When the government fails us, call on Americans to “get ‘er dun”! Standing ovation for these patriots! I hope they keep building!

    1. @sonofagip I would say the private sector is more effective than the public… but you should know that, right?

    2. Basic math not in the old skillset, eh?

      Kolfage has lots of volunteers. That’s a freebie clue. The intellectually honest thing to do would be to compare as a set of highly complex problems.

    3. Trump has a whole lot more to worry about then Brian Kolfage does.Keep it in perspective goofy

    4. Kolfage doesn’t have the entire dem party plus the MSM (but I repeat myself) sueing him and throwing up roadblocks.
      Not to mention all the govt red tape and dumb agencies to stall everything.
      Doesn’t quite fit your narrative does it? I didn’t vote for Trump, but I will!

      1. Yep. Always someone else’s fault for why Trump can’t build the wall or control the borders. The buck never stops with Donald John Trump.

        1. In this case, you are exactly right…if Trump had clear sailing, we’d at least have a good start on the wall.
          But of course, you will argue the issue.

      2. Actually, he did have local officials try to block him and cancel permits. They were too late and he was already too big by then to use their powers to illegally block him.

    5. …..because McConnell and Pelosi were not obstructing Mr. Kolfage every inch of the way.Nice job Mr.Kolfage, you and your team keep up the great work

    1. Proud?..Proud to have your PT Barnum of a president sucker you into paying for something that through the entire campaign and beyond he insisted Mexico would pay for?..Vicente Fox was right when he said “Mexico isn’t paying for your fawking wall “

  4. So, one thing I’ve been curious about with this (really), is – are they going to establish a border checkpoint along this wall somewhere? Or, connect it to some kind of natural barrier like a cliff face? Or is it just going to be a stretch of wall that ultimately you can walk around if you just follow it long enough?

    1. No, we should just give up and not do anything because someone, somewhere will find a flaw. :question:

      1. Sheesh, that’s not what I said. I’m simply asking whether we’re just building a bunch of vertical rails out in the middle of nowhere, or if this is actually some kind of enforceable border.

        Is this actually a wall, or just a detour?

    2. Look at the satellite imagery. About another 1.5km further west, there’s already US government fencing starting at the edge of a Mexican town built right up to the border.

      Meeting the other fence is unnecessary. The reason this spot is so high-traffic is there is lots of development where the borders of Texas, New Mexico, Mexico, and the Rio Grande meet. Before this section was built, Illegals could get very close to the border mingled with legit pedestrian traffic, jump across, and then mix in on US side.

      The fencing forces them about 1KM into the open, very rough desert — no vegetation, buildings or people. They’ll stick out like sore thumbs on thermal imagery and the trek will take them 20-30 minutes, plenty of time for CBP to setup an intercept.

  5. Excellent , very proud of these willing Americans helping to protect our Country.
    :clapping: :clapping:

    1. This is why America is so great. We take action and are independent. We don’t wait for the government to solve our problems.

    1. Proud?..Proud to have your PT Barnum of a president sucker you into paying for something that through the entire campaign and beyond he insisted Mexico would pay for?..Vicente Fox was right when he said “Mexico isn’t paying for your fawking wall “

  6. This privately funded project proved, beyond the shadow of doubt, that limited government interference in our lives is essential.

  7. This wall looks like one of the less effective stretches, and I’m not sure there will be much reduction in traffic as a result of the wall in the picture going up, BUT if section 2 is on the East side causing a chokepoint in the road it will be more effective, AND every piece of wall is good.

  8. This privately funded project proved, beyond the shadow of doubt, that limited government interference in our lives is essential.

  9. This wall looks like one of the less effective stretches, and I’m not sure there will be much reduction in traffic as a result of the wall in the picture going up, BUT if section 2 is on the East side causing a chokepoint in the road it will be more effective, AND every piece of wall is good.

  10. When the border is secured in vital places by a wall, all of the Trump-obsessed critics will forget about it, as if it never happened. The wall will be treated like landscape, and the remaining traffic that dwindles to a minimum will be treated like all the traffic there ever was.

    “Look! 200 people crossed in El Paso!”

    Nevermind the thousands that used to cross unchecked.

    I’m grateful that Trump obsessed critics have no say in matters of security, and I pray for the safety of their children.

  11. Someone please correct me if I’ve mis-measured, but I measured it out to be just a hair less than 4/10 of a mile. If the cost of this segment was 8 million dollars, that would work out to be about $20 million per mile. I believe I read location was donated by the land owner, so that figure would exclude land acquisition costs. This section has some terrain, but it is also right next to major roads and a RR, so relatively easy access. Factoring in more difficult sites, land acquisition costs, etc, $20 million per mile could end up being quite conservative.

    1. I think this is a very teachable moment.

      I’m very pleased a determined US citizen with a vision made this happen without any government assistance.

    2. Not an option, at least not for the entire wall. Many of the land owners along the border do not want a wall. So without the government taking it, there is no way to get the land.

  12. When the border is secured in vital places by a wall, all of the Trump-obsessed critics will forget about it, as if it never happened. The wall will be treated like landscape, and the remaining traffic that dwindles to a minimum will be treated like all the traffic there ever was.

    “Look! 200 people crossed in El Paso!”

    Nevermind the thousands that used to cross unchecked.

    I’m grateful that Trump obsessed critics have no say in matters of security, and I pray for the safety of their children.

  13. Looking at satellite images, you can see why this wall will be so effective, even along this short section. Illegals will be forced to walk hundreds of yards, over very rough terrain in the open with no structures or vegetation to hide among, just to go around the fence.

    During that hike, they’ll stick out like sore thumbs on thermal imaging and CBP will have plenty of time to setup for an interception. Kolfage’s pics are taken from the north looking south, west is to your right.

    If you follow the border west on satellite maps about 1.5KM from the end of the new wall, the US government border fencing begins near the start of a Mexican town right up against the border.

    Kudos to We Build The Wall.

  14. This makes me VERY happy! American ingenuity and persistence. When the government fails us, call on Americans to “get ‘er dun”! Standing ovation for these patriots! I hope they keep building!

    1. @sonofagip I would say the private sector is more effective than the public… but you should know that, right?

    2. Kolfage doesn’t have the entire dem party plus the MSM (but I repeat myself) sueing him and throwing up roadblocks.
      Not to mention all the govt red tape and dumb agencies to stall everything.
      Doesn’t quite fit your narrative does it? I didn’t vote for Trump, but I will!

      1. Actually, he did have local officials try to block him and cancel permits. They were too late and he was already too big by then to use their powers to illegally block him.

      2. Yep. Always someone else’s fault for why Trump can’t build the wall or control the borders. The buck never stops with Donald John Trump.

        1. In this case, you are exactly right…if Trump had clear sailing, we’d at least have a good start on the wall.
          But of course, you will argue the issue.

            1. True enough. He also had Ryno as speaker, who was a Boehner Boy. It wasn’t as though he had no opposition.

            2. I never thought of Republican’s as being all of one mind as the Democrats are, this is a good example of that.
              There are a lot of Republicans who group think with the Dem’s. We knew that since 2016. Not all of them though.

    3. …..because McConnell and Pelosi were not obstructing Mr. Kolfage every inch of the way.Nice job Mr.Kolfage, you and your team keep up the great work

    4. Basic math not in the old skillset, eh?

      Kolfage has lots of volunteers. That’s a freebie clue. The intellectually honest thing to do would be to compare as a set of highly complex problems.

    5. Trump has a whole lot more to worry about then Brian Kolfage does.Keep it in perspective goofy

  15. Excellent , very proud of these willing Americans helping to protect our Country.
    :clapping: :clapping:

    1. This is why America is so great. We take action and are independent. We don’t wait for the government to solve our problems.

      1. My lunatic, militant revisionist professor thinks American exceptionalism is a racist ideology.

        Of course, it’s a socio-economic philosophy used in the modern political realm, so he’s out of his specialty and should shut up about it.

  16. So, one thing I’ve been curious about with this (really), is – are they going to establish a border checkpoint along this wall somewhere? Or, connect it to some kind of natural barrier like a cliff face? Or is it just going to be a stretch of wall that ultimately you can walk around if you just follow it long enough?

    1. No, we should just give up and not do anything because someone, somewhere will find a flaw. :question:

      1. Sheesh, that’s not what I said. I’m simply asking whether we’re just building a bunch of vertical rails out in the middle of nowhere, or if this is actually some kind of enforceable border.

        Is this actually a wall, or just a detour?

        1. @atomicsentinel

          Here’s BEFORE and AFTER photos of the now finished wall segment built by “We Build The Wall” GoFundMe group!
          The Right Scoop
          Jun. 4, 2019 5:21 pm by The Right Scoop •

          WALL !!!!

          1. Yes, I’ve seen them – but do they actually wall anything off? Again, what’s to stop people from simply going around them once the wall stops? Physical barrier? Guard station? Body of water?

            I’m not criticizing the damned thing, I’m just trying to picture it finished.

            1. I think this wall just creates a barrier at the most easily traversable terrain forcing illegals to go around it to much harsher terrain. This makes it easier to spot and capture them. They are scheduled to build another mile of wall west of there extending the barrier.(If I remember the initial story correctly)

        2. Adding to what I wrote above, trekking the extra 20-30 minutes on both sides of the new fencing over rough, open country will basically turn off the spigot at this spot. It will go from ~1200 per day to near zero at this location.

          …but! …they’ll move to another location.

          So, it doesn’t solve all illegal border crossings, but it does make life much more difficult for coyotes. They’ll have to move down river or further west along the old fencing. Either way, catches will go up, coyote pricing will go way up, CBP’s job at this point will be much easier, and successful illegal crossings will go down relative to crossings prior to this segment being built.

            1. @AT I would be so happy for you if that was true. Sometimes you’re obviously in a great mood. Others, not so much.

              1. It’s a mistake to impute emotion to my posts. Just assume they’re coming from a cold, emotionless robot.

                That’s how I read all y’alls. Just words on a screen. No person behind them. It’s better that way.

                1. @at Actually over the years you have made a few statements of fact that point to not being perfectly happy, which means you’re just like the rest of us. Just saying if your statement of hyperbole were true I would be happy for you.

                2. Well sure I’m not perfectly happy. That level of perfection won’t happen until an asteroid slams into this mudball.

                3. Oh that’s not a dark statement at all. You won’t be perfectly happy until you and every living thing on the planet is dead? Ooookay then.

    2. Look at the satellite imagery. About another 1.5km further west, there’s already US government fencing starting at the edge of a Mexican town built right up to the border.

      Meeting the other fence is unnecessary. The reason this spot is so high-traffic is there is lots of development where the borders of Texas, New Mexico, Mexico, and the Rio Grande meet. Before this section was built, Illegals could get very close to the border mingled with legit pedestrian traffic, jump across, and then mix in on US side.

      The fencing forces them about 1KM into the open, very rough desert — no vegetation, buildings or people. They’ll stick out like sore thumbs on thermal imagery and the trek will take them 20-30 minutes, plenty of time for CBP to setup an intercept.

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