Here’s how many Millennials get money from mommy and daddy on a MONTHLY basis…

Yes, it’s bad. If you clicked on the link because of the headline [as we usually plan these things], then let me tell you, it’s as bad as you think it is. Probably worse.

It’s 37%.

More than a third of all Millennials.

Nearly four out of every ten Millennials you know get money from mommy and daddy on a monthly basis just to continue their wretched existence on this amazingly wonderful planet.

Astounding.



There’s this statistic, which really isn’t as bad:

More than half of Americans (53%) aged 21 to 37 have received financial assistance from a parent, guardian, or family member since turning 21, according to the 2018 Country Financial Security Index.

That’s a high number, but honestly, it’s reasonable that some young people might need assistance from family after turning 21. It’s not ideal, but emergencies happen.

This. from the Business Insider, is frightening though:

About 37% of millennials receive money on a monthly basis, and more than half (59%) receive money several times a year. Many are putting this money towards basic needs, both small and significant, like cell phone bills, groceries and gas, health insurance, and rent.

Let me sum up that paragraph: we are doomed.

If you can’t earn a living without assistance from mommy and daddy on a monthly basis, you need to change some things. Find a better job. Move to a cheaper place. Redo your budget.

There’s always some people who, through no fault of their own, just need help. That’s understandable. But I guarantee you that 37% of Millennials are not that.

So much of the American identity in the past has been about self-reliance and toughness. How is it OK to live off your parents without feeling some shame? The American empire will not be brought down by our external enemies, no one is powerful enough. But we CAN erode our character to the point where we cannot continue.

I reiterate: We are doomed.

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128 thoughts on “Here’s how many Millennials get money from mommy and daddy on a MONTHLY basis…

  1. …..no problems ,these illegals in twenty years will be begging their home country to allow them too return.

  2. As long as these perpetual children get the dollars from mummy and daddy and not the gooberment dole, I’m fine with that.

  3. Started work at 15, earned an occasional allowance for the work I did around the house before graduating high school, never took a dime from parents after high school.

  4. I send my 20 year old $150/month and pay his insurance. In August, it’ll drop to %50/month plus insurance.

    That was the deal, while he’s in school I help with bills. I subtract $100 a year till it’s gone.

    B. H. Obama requires me to provide his health insurance until he’ 98 years old or something, so I have to do that.

  5. In all actuality, I thought it was much higher, like HALF. But I stand corrected. That’s still bad now mind you, just not as bad as I would have thought.

  6. I can’t really judge the numbers. They can be misleading without underlying information. How many are still in college and/or just starting to head out on their own? Does this include money that was paid back? How many only received very minor amounts of money (<$50)? What would the numbers have been for the previous generation? For all we know it would have been similar.

    The question is too vague to get any meaning out of it.

  7. I’m retired…..read articles on a lot of sites. One I hit several times a day…”The Hill.”
    Well….every time I comment on a story……within minutes….inbox reply.
    Rabid leftists outraged at whatever I’ve posted……my point?
    Well I purposely do it during the nation’s “working” hours. The replies are all obviously from people in their +/- 20s.
    I hit them up with….why aren’t you at work?….living in your mummy’s basement?…..etc.
    This usually shuts them up, because my assessment was correct.

  8. We haven’t supported our son since he graduated from college and even then he worked part time as a DJ or a bartender. Worked since he was 12; folding boxes in a pizza shop and moving shopping carts at a grocery story. He was seldom without a job. Once he graduated he was home for less than a year and moved out………as soon as he found someone to share expenses. Lasted for a few years, met his wife and the rest as they say is history. He’s a dad of two now and happily so.

  9. Given the catastrophic costs of senior living, it would not surprise that a lot of boomers see this as a down-payment for their own care in near future. This sort of arrangement is not unusual in many traditionalist countries across Asia and southern Europe. Parents continue supporting their kids well into adulthood with the expectation that they would be cared for in their old age.

    1. Any parents who depend on these millennials(I’m generalizing a bit) are freaking doomed. Selfishness is their bread and butter.

  10. My mother has been trying for 40 years to make me move back home to take care of her and Daddy……and COOK for them!

  11. My parents always told me there are two types of people in this world……the ones that educate themselves and work hard while they are young and party when they are older. Then there are those that party when young and work until they die.

  12. No we’re not doomed if the moochers were 73 % I would agree but it is 37 %. There is more hope for us with the responsibly raised people.

  13. I think that this started with the ‘Greatest Generation.’ After growing up in the Depression and experiencing the post-war affluence, they didn’t want their children to want for anything, and therefore spoiled them. Of course, I’m not speaking of everyone, but I think that it happened quite frequently.

  14. Remember… these are the people who will be providing for us when we are 80. If filling Granny’s oxygen tank means their phone gets cut off, which do you think they will choose?

    I have two in my home right now. 30-something relatives (barely related) who failed at life and “just need a place to stay for a few days”. It has been two months and I kick them out tomorrow. Just like previous examples with other relatives, I will have to force them out because they feel they have a “right” to stay as long as they want/need. That generation is just 30 year old teenagers.

    1. You will have to engage the local sheriff’s dept for this as once they’ve been there for so long, they’re considered tenants. Make the environment for them as hostile as you can and they’ll leave on their own (hopefully)…

    2. So many things wrong with what you wrote @Tom T good luck with getting them out but why the mentality that these are the people providing for us when we are 80 ? Those 30 somethings shouldn’t be your problem and you should have a financial plan where you won’t be anyone’s problem. Make sense ?

    3. @tom-t Good luck with that, seriously. Recently, I’ve read about people being forced to keep what are essentially squatters. Our rights are being eroded at every level.

  15. When I turned 18, I couldn’t get away from my parents and get my own place fast enough. I moved out a few days after graduating high school and never looked back. Probably improved my relationship with my parents by doing so.

  16. In all actuality, I thought it was much higher, like HALF. But I stand corrected. That’s still bad now mind you, just not as bad as I would have thought.

  17. I send my 20 year old $150/month and pay his insurance. In August, it’ll drop to %50/month plus insurance.

    That was the deal, while he’s in school I help with bills. I subtract $100 a year till it’s gone.

    B. H. Obama requires me to provide his health insurance until he’ 98 years old or something, so I have to do that.

    1. I made the deal with my kids that IF they go to school, they can live at home for free. IF they decide to work, then they pay rent. I would, however, save half of their rent they pay in an account and when they decided to move out, I’d give that what I had saved back to them for their “deposit” and a life start.

        1. Well, they are millenials so I had to make it so they didn’t think I was messing with their heads…

  18. My mother has been trying for 40 years to make me move back home to take care of her and Daddy……and COOK for them!

    1. That’s when you know you’ve led a successful life.

      I figure life comes in three stages.

      1) Someone takes care of you.
      2) You take care of yourself.
      3) You take care of others.

      At once point in our society, it was a natural transition. Now we can’t seem to make that jump from one to two. And even if we do make it to two, we’re not exactly building wealth the way we were in this society. Which makes the jump from two to three all that much harder.

      1. Agreed.

        There are some cultures that I really appreciate where several generations live under one roof, or on one property. Sounds really great if you get along with your family. If not, sounds hellish.

        An army buddy of mine retired and moved back to Mexico. He lives with his wife and 40 kids (seems like, I think it’s 7), his mom, his wife’s mom, dad, and grandmother. Last time I was there is was like 20 people. The old folks watch the kids during the day while he and his wife work running a charter fishing guide service. It was really beautiful And chaotic.

  19. This is disgusting in the sense that these kids could not survive on their own. Back in my day, before the wheel was invented, I knew there was no money for college and so I started at the bottom and clawed my way up until I could finally start my own company. The rest of the world must be laughing their asses off at us, and I wouldn’t blame them if they did. I sometimes think of my grandmother and all of her life skills…and I’m not even close. But during the Depression, my mother and her siblings ate like kings because my grandmother knew how to plant, grow, harvest, can, preserve, etc. She made the kids’ clothes, she knew how to do everything and more. Today these kids can’t even sew on a button. Thank you public education! Thank you worthless colleges! Thank you lazy assed parents!

  20. My parents always told me there are two types of people in this world……the ones that educate themselves and work hard while they are young and party when they are older. Then there are those that party when young and work until they die.

  21. No we’re not doomed if the moochers were 73 % I would agree but it is 37 %. There is more hope for us with the responsibly raised people.

  22. This is disgusting in the sense that these kids could not survive on their own. Back in my day, before the wheel was invented, I knew there was no money for college and so I started at the bottom and clawed my way up until I could finally start my own company. The rest of the world must be laughing their asses off at us, and I wouldn’t blame them if they did. I sometimes think of my grandmother and all of her life skills…and I’m not even close. But during the Depression, my mother and her siblings ate like kings because my grandmother knew how to plant, grow, harvest, can, preserve, etc. She made the kids’ clothes, she knew how to do everything and more. Today these kids can’t even sew on a button. Thank you public education! Thank you worthless colleges! Thank you lazy assed parents!

  23. I think that this started with the ‘Greatest Generation.’ After growing up in the Depression and experiencing the post-war affluence, they didn’t want their children to want for anything, and therefore spoiled them. Of course, I’m not speaking of everyone, but I think that it happened quite frequently.

  24. Remember… these are the people who will be providing for us when we are 80. If filling Granny’s oxygen tank means their phone gets cut off, which do you think they will choose?

    I have two in my home right now. 30-something relatives (barely related) who failed at life and “just need a place to stay for a few days”. It has been two months and I kick them out tomorrow. Just like previous examples with other relatives, I will have to force them out because they feel they have a “right” to stay as long as they want/need. That generation is just 30 year old teenagers.

    1. @tom-t Good luck with that, seriously. Recently, I’ve read about people being forced to keep what are essentially squatters. Our rights are being eroded at every level.

    2. So many things wrong with what you wrote @Tom T good luck with getting them out but why the mentality that these are the people providing for us when we are 80 ? Those 30 somethings shouldn’t be your problem and you should have a financial plan where you won’t be anyone’s problem. Make sense ?

    3. You will have to engage the local sheriff’s dept for this as once they’ve been there for so long, they’re considered tenants. Make the environment for them as hostile as you can and they’ll leave on their own (hopefully)…

  25. When I turned 18, I couldn’t get away from my parents and get my own place fast enough. I moved out a few days after graduating high school and never looked back. Probably improved my relationship with my parents by doing so.

    1. Unfortunately you are correct. I am one of those parents who did not realize the comfy, safe childhood we gave them would make them so weak.

      Every generation wants to give their children a “perfect” life. We realize now that a childhood with NO adversity or obstacles results in fragile cowards afraid of responsibility and risk. That was in the 90s and it is even worse now with “progressive” garbage being fed to them 24/7 in schools and online.

  26. We haven’t supported our son since he graduated from college and even then he worked part time as a DJ or a bartender. Worked since he was 12; folding boxes in a pizza shop and moving shopping carts at a grocery story. He was seldom without a job. Once he graduated he was home for less than a year and moved out………as soon as he found someone to share expenses. Lasted for a few years, met his wife and the rest as they say is history. He’s a dad of two now and happily so.

        1. @dr-strangelove The answer to that question is NO. Have a feeling it was someone who went to TOS.

              1. @sjmom I hope so, I keep flagging them for comment policy violations, but nothing ever happens.

  27. What’s wrong with the parents? (By the way, I wonder what percentage of millenials are living at home but don’t show up here because the parents are giving them food & housing, but not money.)

  28. I’m retired…..read articles on a lot of sites. One I hit several times a day…”The Hill.”
    Well….every time I comment on a story……within minutes….inbox reply.
    Rabid leftists outraged at whatever I’ve posted……my point?
    Well I purposely do it during the nation’s “working” hours. The replies are all obviously from people in their +/- 20s.
    I hit them up with….why aren’t you at work?….living in your mummy’s basement?…..etc.
    This usually shuts them up, because my assessment was correct.

    1. Unfortunately you are correct. I am one of those parents who did not realize the comfy, safe childhood we gave them would make them so weak.

      Every generation wants to give their children a “perfect” life. We realize now that a childhood with NO adversity or obstacles results in fragile cowards afraid of responsibility and risk. That was in the 90s and it is even worse now with “progressive” garbage being fed to them 24/7 in schools and online.

  29. And parents are killing this country by doing so. As Soopermexican said. Now, they want the government to give them everything because, well, mom and dad always did. Pop the titty out of their mouths or yes, we’re all doomed.

    Hey, nothing wrong, when in an emergency, mom and dad throwing a helping hand but it has to be done wisely. A monthly payment to the child renders them a child for freaking life.

    1. @ryan-o Ha! Haven’t heard that in a long time. I remember when, if a guy was past his teens and still living at home, we said, “He’s still sucking at the titty.” How times have changed. I have a nephew who is pushing 30 and still living in the basement. The subject is, of course, taboo.

  30. A big part of the problem is that generation doesn’t, at all, understand the term “basic needs.”

    1. Ain’t that the freaking truth. I was homeless four times between the ages of 17 and 27. It sucked, but I damn sure learned what “needs” really were.

      1. Yep, there’s clearly a difference between basic “needs” and basic “wants” and this generation cannot tell the difference. They think that a “cell” phone or internet access is a need. No, it’s a luxury and if you can’t afford it, don’t get it.

      1. Or even just the decadent stuff that we all “need” but could very easily live without.

        Cell phone, internet, cable TV, TV at all, etc.

        And then on the flip page, we whine that Google doesn’t play fair on the thing we don’t even have a right to the means of accessing in the first place.

        1. Spot on, I don’t complain about Facebook or Google, it’s their platform, we clicked “Agree” on their terms of service. If we don’t like how they do business, we can go elsewhere. I don’t have a FB account anymore, I recently killed my twitter account but then wen’t through withdrawls “LOL” and created another one. I have to use google as it’s the email address I’ve had for years but other than that, I don’t use them for anything.

      2. Exactly and that’s why I rank all this stupid “Little Princess” and “Little Prince” psychojunk right up there with the whole “self-esteem” garbage as two of my biggest pet peeves in today’s culture. We are Americans. We don’t have a monarchy nor do we have self-idolatry or at least we didn’t until we turned the raising of our children over to the educational child psychologists and television pop psychologists. Our children have been ruined ever since.

  31. Given the catastrophic costs of senior living, it would not surprise that a lot of boomers see this as a down-payment for their own care in near future. This sort of arrangement is not unusual in many traditionalist countries across Asia and southern Europe. Parents continue supporting their kids well into adulthood with the expectation that they would be cared for in their old age.

    1. Any parents who depend on these millennials(I’m generalizing a bit) are freaking doomed. Selfishness is their bread and butter.

  32. I can’t really judge the numbers. They can be misleading without underlying information. How many are still in college and/or just starting to head out on their own? Does this include money that was paid back? How many only received very minor amounts of money (<$50)? What would the numbers have been for the previous generation? For all we know it would have been similar.

    The question is too vague to get any meaning out of it.

  33. Started work at 15, earned an occasional allowance for the work I did around the house before graduating high school, never took a dime from parents after high school.

  34. What’s wrong with the parents? (By the way, I wonder what percentage of millenials are living at home but don’t show up here because the parents are giving them food & housing, but not money.)

  35. …..no problems ,these illegals in twenty years will be begging their home country to allow them too return.

  36. This millennial generation is not going to be better off than their previous generation. 8 Years of Democrat policy will make this happen every time.

  37. Obama didn’t help either. Parents can keep their children on health insurance until 26. Delaying adolescence until 26

    1. @danaellen Not really. That age group typically doesn’t get insurance on their own anyway because they don’t need it. That law was essentially getting the parents to pay the premiums for them. More money for the insurance industry without having to pay more out in claims. It’s all about the Benjamins.

    2. I know right? I was appalled when they did that. I would have been mortified to have been kept on my parents’ insurance at 26. I had been buying my own insurance for 7 years by then both car and health. I was working full time and going to school. Met my Hubby at that age and we got married the following year. I never in a million years thought of myself as a immature dependent who needed mommy and daddy to hold my hand.

  38. When I turned 21 my father, who had just finished paying for my college degree, said I am through. You are on your own! He made me move out of the house, too. Best thing he ever did.

    1. Mine did that when I turned 19. He didn’t mind if I lived at home to spare expenses though but I did pay rent and I bought groceries.

  39. And they will be more then happy to vote for more free stuff from Democrats especially guaranteed basic income. We are doomed.

  40. I don’t give my son(30) and daughter(28) a penny, nor have they asked. For better or worse, they’re financially on their own.

  41. No not quite right,”here’s how millennials get money from Mommy on a monthly basis.” My wife was the generous one in our family.

  42. Triage the misnamed “homeless” issue: (1) the temporarily have nots; (2) the can nots and (3) the will nots.

    1. Social safety net has long cared for those who temporarily don’t have anything.

    2. State lock-down care institutions are needed for those who cannot do anything for themselves

    3. Those who will not are on their own, with full consequences under their own choice and control.

    1. Much of the homeless are mislabeled addicts. They are homeless by choice to feed their addiction.

  43. So what you’re saying is it’s mommy and daddy’s fault these little snowflake darlings have the entitlement attitude. I would have to agree.

  44. As long as these perpetual children get the dollars from mummy and daddy and not the gooberment dole, I’m fine with that.

  45. And parents are killing this country by doing so. As Soopermexican said. Now, they want the government to give them everything because, well, mom and dad always did. Pop the titty out of their mouths or yes, we’re all doomed.

    Hey, nothing wrong, when in an emergency, mom and dad throwing a helping hand but it has to be done wisely. A monthly payment to the child renders them a child for freaking life.

    1. @ryan-o Ha! Haven’t heard that in a long time. I remember when, if a guy was past his teens and still living at home, we said, “He’s still sucking at the titty.” How times have changed. I have a nephew who is pushing 30 and still living in the basement. The subject is, of course, taboo.

  46. A big part of the problem is that generation doesn’t, at all, understand the term “basic needs.”

      1. Exactly and that’s why I rank all this stupid “Little Princess” and “Little Prince” psychojunk right up there with the whole “self-esteem” garbage as two of my biggest pet peeves in today’s culture. We are Americans. We don’t have a monarchy nor do we have self-idolatry or at least we didn’t until we turned the raising of our children over to the educational child psychologists and television pop psychologists. Our children have been ruined ever since.

      2. Or even just the decadent stuff that we all “need” but could very easily live without.

        Cell phone, internet, cable TV, TV at all, etc.

        And then on the flip page, we whine that Google doesn’t play fair on the thing we don’t even have a right to the means of accessing in the first place.

        1. Spot on, I don’t complain about Facebook or Google, it’s their platform, we clicked “Agree” on their terms of service. If we don’t like how they do business, we can go elsewhere. I don’t have a FB account anymore, I recently killed my twitter account but then wen’t through withdrawls “LOL” and created another one. I have to use google as it’s the email address I’ve had for years but other than that, I don’t use them for anything.

    1. Ain’t that the freaking truth. I was homeless four times between the ages of 17 and 27. It sucked, but I damn sure learned what “needs” really were.

  47. This millennial generation is not going to be better off than their previous generation. 8 Years of Democrat policy will make this happen every time.

  48. Obama didn’t help either. Parents can keep their children on health insurance until 26. Delaying adolescence until 26

    1. @danaellen Not really. That age group typically doesn’t get insurance on their own anyway because they don’t need it. That law was essentially getting the parents to pay the premiums for them. More money for the insurance industry without having to pay more out in claims. It’s all about the Benjamins.

    2. I know right? I was appalled when they did that. I would have been mortified to have been kept on my parents’ insurance at 26. I had been buying my own insurance for 7 years by then both car and health. I was working full time and going to school. Met my Hubby at that age and we got married the following year. I never in a million years thought of myself as a immature dependent who needed mommy and daddy to hold my hand.

  49. When I turned 21 my father, who had just finished paying for my college degree, said I am through. You are on your own! He made me move out of the house, too. Best thing he ever did.

    1. Mine did that when I turned 19. He didn’t mind if I lived at home to spare expenses though but I did pay rent and I bought groceries.

  50. And they will be more then happy to vote for more free stuff from Democrats especially guaranteed basic income. We are doomed.

  51. I don’t give my son(30) and daughter(28) a penny, nor have they asked. For better or worse, they’re financially on their own.

  52. No not quite right,”here’s how millennials get money from Mommy on a monthly basis.” My wife was the generous one in our family.

  53. Triage the misnamed “homeless” issue: (1) the temporarily have nots; (2) the can nots and (3) the will nots.

    1. Social safety net has long cared for those who temporarily don’t have anything.

    2. State lock-down care institutions are needed for those who cannot do anything for themselves

    3. Those who will not are on their own, with full consequences under their own choice and control.

    1. Much of the homeless are mislabeled addicts. They are homeless by choice to feed their addiction.

  54. So what you’re saying is it’s mommy and daddy’s fault these little snowflake darlings have the entitlement attitude. I would have to agree.

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