NYPD officer in Eric Garner case FIRED from NYPD

It was announced today that Daniel Pantaleo was fired from NYPD, five years after his takedown of Eric Garner that ended with Garner’s death:

FOX NEWS – Daniel Pantaleo, the New York City police officer accused in the 2014 death of Eric Garner that sparked nationwide outrage, has been fired, Commissioner James O’Neill announced Monday afternoon.

O’Neill, who said it was “an extremely difficult decision,” said he made his final call in the “last couple of days” over the case that has spanned five years of investigations and protests.

“None of us can take back our decisions,” O’Neill told reporters, “especially when they lead to the death of another human being.”

Pantaleo had been suspended since Aug. 2, after a department disciplinary judge recommended his termination.

“I agree, he can no longer effectively serve as a New York City police officer,” O’Neill said.



That last line is probably true, especially given how nearly all of the 2020 Democratic field are besmirching the name of Pantaleo on national debate stages, who was just trying to do his job. They treat him as if he’s some kind of rogue murderer being protected by the system.

It was incredibly unfortunate what happened to Eric Garner, but if he had not fought police and refused arrest, he’d likely still be alive today.

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67 thoughts on “NYPD officer in Eric Garner case FIRED from NYPD

  1. This was done on the orders of commie dickblasio and the stopping of people selling loose cigarettes. This officer needs to sue the city, dickblasio and the police commissioner. This order came directly from dickblasio, just like the order from the mayor of Portland to police to stand down against antifags.

  2. An office job would have sufficed… but fire him? For what? Pantaleo should sue the NYPD for wrongful termination.

  3. I think this was a no-win situation. If they kept Pantaleo segments of the black community would riot and more officers would be hurt. If they fired him (which they’ve done) it was only in the hopes that segments of the black community would be pacified and maybe officers lives would not be jeopardized. But I’m thinking that the latter is a hopeless cause. Several in the black community are vested in being victims and will use this to gin up more trouble and officers will be hurt anyway. There is just no good solution here especially when segments of the black community have learned that there’s a cash cow to be had in there. Like Trayvon Martin’s folks along with Michael Brown’s folks they quickly learned that there is a lot of fame and money to be had on the victim circuit even though they knew their kids were both thugs and criminals.

    1. It wouldn’t matter how this shook out… It appears New York is on a mission to wipe out their police Dept. Only question is…how long before they ALL voluntarily stand down and let that city circle the drain.

  4. Looking at the picture the guy has a good chance of playing a Russian hit man in a movie. Can he drop the NYC accent for an “I must break you?”

  5. Well, I don’t know about anyone else, but I learned an important lesson.

    If I’m from the government and wearing a badge, I probably shouldn’t choke people to death on the sidewalk.

    1. Actually, I probably shouldn’t do that whether I’m wearing a badge or not. That seems like something you’d go to jail for.

      Unless you’re from the government. Then *wrist slap*.

  6. Honestly given Garner’s “crime”, I don’t see why they couldn’t have just given the man a ticket and told him to move along.

    1. He was a public menace, dino. He was on the sidewalk interfering with a business. And he was committing a serious crime. A crime that the State decided was a crime because… well, I don’t know, but the law is the law.

      Clearly he had to die. I mean, he resisted police. That’s an instant death sentence and should be.

      AM I RIGHT GUYS? LOOKING FORWARD TO ALL YOUR UPVOTES FOR TAKING THE POSITION THAT YOU ALWAYS TAKE ON THE SUBJECT I AM TOTALLY AGREEING WITH YOU ON HERE.

  7. Let’s keep things in perspective on this…

    Of ALL the Officer involved deaths during the last 5 years… THIS one was the most troubling.

    A guy selling cigarettes on the sidewalk to make money did not deserve to be man handled by the police in such a way that it caused his death.

    Officer Pantaleo used excessive force when taking into consideration (A) the alleged crime, (B) the health and poor shape of Mr. Garner. Mr. Garner’s obesity put him “at risk” for ANY physical altercation between himself and the police and using a choke hold put him into a health crisis that he eventually succumbed to.

    While it is easy to make claims that Mr. Garner’s lack of co-operation led to his death, it is STILL incumbent upon the police to use only the appropriate force to make an apprehension… NOT resort to tactics that would put an obese person into cardiac arrest.

    Other options were available to Office Pantaleo… but he chose the one that would cut off the air supply to someone who was susceptible to a cardiac arrest.

    It was irresponsible of him to take the actions that he did that day, and if I were the D.A. I would have filed manslaughter charges against him.

    1. Ooooohhhh, prepare to be hated my friend.

      Not only did this guy have to die, but it’s the mayors fault because… because…. I don’t know I’m smoking a bunch of crack.

    2. ‘While it is easy to make claims …..’ It’s also easy to be opinionated. Do you know what a District Attorney does?

    3. Yes, but it’s Mike Bloomberg who should be in jail. He created the crime by charging $5 tax on a pack of cigs.

    4. BS. He was selling cigarettes in front of a business and had been repeatedly warned. Then he refused to obey a lawful order and resisted.

  8. This one is a tough one for me. While I feel that the officer does not deserve to be fired, I agree that he would be next to worthless on the streets as a cop. Every single incident he was involved in would be scrutinized through the lens of “police brutality” and the end result would likely be guilty criminals going free due to this.

    1. True..unless the perps made it to trial before a lefty judge who THEN returns them to the streets at that time…

    2. That’s true. I think his firing was politically motivated. Likely to prevent riots. He should sue for wrongful termination.

      1. Even cops working a desk touch evidence, book criminals, record confessions…..etc.

        It’s pretty tough to find a position for a police officer where he isn’t involved in law enforcement.

        It’s like trying to pick up a turd by the clean end…

  9. Feel bad for cop, but thank God.

    Now I can go home today and don’t have to worry about rioting on the subway.

    1. Without scrolling any further, I’m going to guess that This user is blocked is at it again.

  10. Mike Bloomberg is the one who should be in jail. He set this whole thing in motion by creating a $5 tax on a pack of cigs. And he made the cops fight the sale of lose untaxed cigs.

    Bloomberg is everything that is wrong with our whole system.

    1. and dickblasio’s policy of using any means to stop the selling of loose cigarettes on the street. Guvment must have that tax money.

  11. Don’t know the answer to this. Do other police officers feel that choke hold he used was appropriate? According to the police commissioner, the cop firing was wrong and he wants the mayor fired. Is he using this incident to get their idiot mayor fired? I don’t understand thinking that cop shouldn’t be fired. The guy was selling cigarettes, not shooting up the city.

    1. Yea but he resisted. If he had just done as the officer said, it wouldn’t have been necessary to choke him to death.

    2. He was repeatedly warned against selling cigarettes in front of businesses. Then he resisted arrest.

    3. He did not comply. No matter the infraction, police cannot walk away from someone who does not follow their orders. Can you imagine what message that would send to all the other lawbreakers? Also, he had been taken in for this dozens of times and that particular day the cops had already wasted a lot of time just trying to persuade him to comply.

  12. “It was incredibly unfortunate what happened to Eric Garner, but if he
    had not fought police and refused arrest, he’d likely still be alive
    today.”

    So would about 95% of those killed by the police.

  13. That’s a real shame. Pantaleo acted in accordance with the rules of NYPD at the time. I hope that someone hires him.

    1. I’m not a police officer, and certainly not one in NY. But if I remember correctly they said the choke was illegal. It’s a shame they didn’t have better training on chokes and armbars. It’s a lot safer to compress the arteries supplying blood to the brain than it is to compress the trachea. They tend to go out a lot quicker, but as soon as you let go, blood flow is restored with no compression damage. Having been RNC’ed unconscious personally, you are in no mood to fight when you wake up. You’re just going, “What happened?”

      Add to that his morbid obesity didn’t help matters. He looked like one of those guys who breathes heavy just by walking.

  14. Mr. Garners race had nothing to do with his death, yet the media constantly refers to him as “black” man killed by “white” police. Stoking much?

  15. Why would anyone become a police officer?!?! Thank God for the ones that serve. Even though I’m upset when I get caught speeding! Lol

  16. Garner’s fam on TV accompanied by Sharpton complaining it took 5 years…right lady. Next time let’s fire the cop immediately. Who needs an expensive investigation or grand jury? You’ll get your wish, ma’am, when anarchy reigns in New York after LEOs decide enough is enough. And they WILL.

    1. That IS pretty appalling, and in poor taste. I despise it when people want to rush to judgment based on outrage and get their pound of flesh. No. Due Process. It’s important.

  17. They treat him as if he’s some kind of rogue murderer being protected by the system.

    That makes sense because that’s exactly how they portray the police in general now-a-days. To win elections the left MUST keep blacks angry.

  18. O’neill could not even bring himself to support his own Officers and the Grand jury who determined no Crimes. O’neill, if he can no longer serve effectively after doing so for the past five years then he should be awarded that Medical Retirement he so deserves.

    1. All the Police did was put the make up back on his face after he committed the Crimes with the make up covering his tatoos,then presented those photos to the same witnesses and yes indeedy it was little Allen who robbed us.I guess they could have searched his home and found the makeup.I wonder who he killed to earn that tear drop.

    2. Because I like you,I will give you an up vote for recreating the squad room scenario.That is funny

  19. Well, that’s better than what happened to officers Nevers and Budzyn in the Malice Green incident in Detroit, 1992.

    Remember that longtime cokehead Green died of heart failure (a typical cokehead death), while resisting arrest (and going for a cop’s gun) in the close aftermath of the Rodney King incident, where an acqittal sparked a riot.

    Before Budzyn & Nevers even had a chance to do the paperwork from the event (which involved two other officers), the Mayor of Detroit called them murderers. Then during the trial, jurors were allowed to watch footage of the Rodney Green “beating”** and the riot.

    It was a joke of a trial.

    **Green was struck only with hollow, plastic tubes, not wooden truncheons. He was bruised & cut in places, but no broken bones or internal organ damage. Officers were trained to swat the large muscles with those telescoping, hollow, plastic batons to stun aggressive detainees. King was a large man, on PCP, and neither batons nor tasers kept him down until several officers converged on him. He wasn’t “beaten” at all. He was subdued.

  20. So nothing happens to the black lady who was the Sargent in charge of this ordeal and was on the scene? She didn’t stop anything.

  21. If the guy hadn’t resisted arrest none of this would have happened. Why would you physically resist arrest?

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