Team Trump to present ‘specific evidence’ during electoral debate on January 6th

Jason Miller told Newsmax yesterday that they plan to present ‘specific evidence’ on January 6th when debate is held on the electoral votes after the objections of Senator Hawley and 30 other House members:



Hawley didn’t announce until this morning that he would be objecting, so this was only a ‘hope’ as of yesterday. Today it appears to be a reality.

Here’s more from Newsmax:

Specific examples of voter fraud will be presented Jan. 6 if debate is held on the 2020 election results, according to Trump campaign senior adviser Jason Miller on Newsmax TV.

Electoral College ballots are scheduled to be certified during a joint session of Congress on Jan. 6. Miller said evidence presented there would be different than that in the legal battles President Donald Trump’s campaign has fought in the courts.

“Any of the [court] dismissals have been on process,” Miller told Carl Higbie on Tuesday’s “Greg Kelly Reports.”

“So, let’s talk about Wisconsin where Mayor [Rudy] Giuliani is leading the legal team, actually filed a Supreme Court case this afternoon that said that we’ve identified over 50,000 ballots in the state of Wisconsin that were cast unconstitutionally.”

The Trump campaign’s fight in Wisconsin has centered on ballots that were cast by people who should not have been allowed to vote.

“Article II of the Constitution makes it very clear, the state legislatures, and state legislatures alone, set up the voting systems for each state, the codes and the way they are conducted,” Miler said. “And what we have here is over 20,000 ballots that were cast without actually having a application on file, the mail ballots. Wisconsin’s very clear, very specific you got to have an application on file.”

Miller said Wisconsin also allowed ballot harvesting and “6,000 or so of these ballots that we believe were just completely null and void from people who never should have been able to cast them.”

He then cited “suitcases of ballots” found in Georgia, the campaign’s inability to “inspect the machines” in Arizona, and Michigan where “they’re running through ballots multiple times.”

“These are the specific types of evidence we want to present to the American people on the national stage and not allow local politicians to sweep it under the rug,” Miller said.

We told you this morning that once the objections are made in writing, then the two houses of Congress separate and debate the objections for a maximum of two hours. It’s during this time, I believe, that Team Trump will present their specific evidence as to why the electoral votes from certain states, like Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, should not be certified.

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